How to build a 4K Hackintosh

How to build a 4K Hackintosh

Full parts list at Amazon:

  • Intel Core i7-4770K Quad-Core Desktop Processor 3.5 GHZ - $320
  • Corsair Enthusiast Series 650W Fan - $99.99
  • Gigabyte GA-Z87X-UD5H Z87 LGA 1150 Motherboard - $222
  • TP-LINK TL-WDN4800 Dual Band Wireless PCI Express Adapter - $43
  • Corsair Vengeance 16GB DDR3 RAM - $160
  • SanDisk Extreme SSD 120 GB SSD - $117 (or any SATA 3 SSD)
  • EVGA GeForce GTX760 Graphics Card - $265
  • Seagate Barracuda 2 TB HDD - $80 (or any 1-4TB SATA3 HDD)
  • Fractal Design Define R4 Case - $132
  • Seiki 39-inch 4K Display - $499 (Varies wildly though)
Total cost without display: $1439. With 4K display, under ~$2,000…


First off, for a processor, I chose the quad-core Intel Core i7-4770K chip, clocked at 3.5GHz. This processor runs $315 on Amazon and is one of the most highly supported and praised processors for a Hackintosh. Plus later on, I can overclock it if I choose to. Next up, I went with 16GB of Corsair Vengeance DDR3 RAM. You can always go with more, as the 4770K processor supports up to 32GB of memory. In terms of storage, I decided to go with both a solid state drive and regular spinning hard drive. The SSD will be used for the operating system and apps, for a quick boot and quick performance, and the spinning drive for media storage. I chose the 120GB SanDisk Extreme SSD. In retrospect, I wish I had gone with a tad more storage, but I can always update it at a later point. For the spinning drive, I chose the 2TB Seagate Barracuda.
For a motherboard, I chose the Gigabyte GA-Z87X-UD5H Z87 LGA 1150 board. The big thing here is making sure that the LGA numbers matchup between your processor and motherboard. In this case, mine did. This motherboard has support for 10 USB ports, 8 of which are USB 3.0. There’s really not much to say about it, except for the fact that it has plenty of ports and a GUI-based BIOS, which can be seen as positive or negative, depending on your preference. It was a positive for me, being relatively clueless within the BIOS.
For a graphics card, I went with the EVGA GeForce GTX760. This card received excellent reviews and is known to work very well with Hackintoshes. I thought about going for something with more power, but decided that I for my use cases, it wasn’t worth the money right now. One of the big things about building your own computer, however, is that you can upgrade individual parts at anytime, so I will definitely do that at some point.
As I noted above, I intend for this machine to be capable of easily powering a 4k monitor, so obviously I needed something to test this with. In order to be somewhat budget-conscious, I chose the Seiki 39-inch 4k display. While not the best display on the market by any means, it’s definitely nothing to slouch at. But more on that later.
Finally, one of the most important aspects for me personally, was finding a good case, and I definitely succeeded with that. I chose the Fractal Design Define R4 case in Black Pearl coloring. From the outside, the case is very sleek and clean, which is exactly what I wanted. Two of the biggest selling points of the case are its insulation and its claim to be totally silent.

Building It

Once I got all of the parts, it was time to put them together, a process that was totally foreign to me. Needless to say, I was a bit intimidated at first, but once I got going, there was nothing too challenging at all.
I’m not going to go into full detail on putting the machine together, but I will say this: The manuals that come with the components, as well as Google, are your best friend. Especially the manuals for the motherboard and case.
When I first got the case, I was shocked at the size and weight, but this turned out to be a great thing. Once I slid off the side panel and begin planning the process, it became clear to me that more room is better than less. I started out by putting in the two storage drives first. This was incredibly simple and involved just attaching the drives to two of the many bays within the case. Then I laid the power supply in the case, using the case manual as a guide.
Next, it was time to place the motherboard in the Design Define. This process was relatively straightforward. I first had to put 10 pegs in the bottom of the case. All of the holes were clearly marked and labeled. Then, I simply had to line the motherboard up with those screws, lay it over them, and then screw it into the pegs. Next came installing the RAM, which was incredibly straight forward, as all I had to do was pull back the ends and slide the RAM right into the board.
After that I installed the Core i7 processor, which, while the most expensive piece of the build, was also the smallest. After I installed the processor, I placed the included processor fan over it, and tightened it to the motherboard. Then came the task of inserting the graphics card, which intimidated me at first, but actually just involved plugging it into the motherboard and making sure the ports were accessible from the outside of the case.
Having put all of the components onto the board, it was now time to plug everything in. This was easily the most tedious task, and really, the only challenging thing about the entire process. It still wasn’t hard, it just took a lot of reading and brain power. After triple-checking that everything was plugged into the correct port, I put the side of the case back on and prepared for the big test of whether it would power on or not. Sure enough, it did power on correctly the first time and it was off to the races to install OS X…

Installing OS X Mavericks
Screen Shot 2013-12-16 at 7.18.20 PM
This is arguably the easiest part of building a Hackintosh. Thanks to tools like UniBeast, making a bootable flash drive of OS X Mavericks is very, very easy, although you need to have another Mac to install it from.
First, I downloaded UniBeast from TonyMacX86.com, as well as the free copy of Mavericks from the Mac App Store. Once both downloads were completed, I launched UniBeast and inserted a 16GB flash drive (though anything 8GB or larger will work).
  1. Purchase OS X from the Mac App Store.
  2. Prepare a USB drive with Disk Utility
  3. Create a bootable USB drive using UniBeast
  4. Boot from the UniBeast drive and install OS X
  5. Use the UniBeast created drive to boot the new installation
In order to boot from the USB drive, I had to change my BIOS settings to look for it first, but once you do that, the OS X install process is exactly like any other Mac. I formatted my SSD into two partitions for my install, one larger 70GB partition for OS X, and a smaller, 50GB partition for Windows 8. The install took roughly 25 minutes, and then it booted right into OS X Mavericks. Don’t get too excited, though, because there’s still a few last things to be done.Screen Shot 2013-12-16 at 7.24.49 PM
I now downloaded MultiBeast from TonyMacx86 and opened it. MultiBeast is the ultimate tool for making your Hackintosh bootable without a flash drive and helping you find the correct drivers. Luckily, the only drive I ended up needing was for audio. I simply chose the “EasyBeast” option from MultiBeast, as well as the drivers for my audio, which if you use the same motherboard as I do, is the Realtek 898.
After the install process with MultiBeast was complete, I rebooted to find sound working perfectly and that I could boot without the USB drive plugged in.

Annoyances/Bugs

One major bug I ran into at first was not being able to download any apps from the Mac App Store. After researching for a while, I found a simple Terminal process to run in order to fix it.
cd /Library/Preferences/SystemConfiguration
cp NetworkInterfaces.plist ~/NetworkInterfaces.plist.bak
sudo rm NetworkInterfaces.plist
Another problem I had was my front USB 3.0 ports not working, but as it turned out, I had forgotten to connect those to the motherboard. Oops.
I’ll keep this part updated with any more bugs I run into (hopefully not that many).
But now, let’s talk 4k.

Seth reviewed the Seiki 39-inch 4K TV in detail earlier this week, and for the most part, I agree with everything he had to say about it. My Hackintosh was able to easily power the display, as well as another 1080p monitor at the same time. I could have multiple 1080p videos playing at once, with no issues whatsoever. The display was essentially plug and play. All I had to do was change the resolution in System Preferences on the Mac.

The mouse lag, which can be totally attributed to the 30Hz capability, is incredibly annoying at first, but once you get use to it, it’s totally okay. The GTX 760 graphics card I put in the Hackintosh was able to handle outputting a 4k resolution without any issues at all. I never experienced any lag related to graphics at all, and 4k videos played back perfectly without any hitches.
Would I recommend the Seiki 39-inch TV as a monitor? No. The 30Hz drawback is just too big for many people, myself included. The big thing for me, however, is the potential. Using OS X at a 4k resolution was absolutely amazing. The amount of content I could fit on one screen is a game changer, and needless to say, everything looked incredibly crisp and sharp. 4k is going to be huge in the future. Or if you get the right monitor and have a computer capable of powering it, it can be huge now. I’m definitely going to be on the lookout for another 4k monitor for daily use. And the fact that my Hackintosh is totally capable of handling it is great.

Wrap-Up

Screen Shot 2013-12-16 at 8.18.26 PMSo, was this Hackintosh a success? Yes. Without a doubt. I could not have asked for this project to have gone any better. As someone who’s never built a computer before, let alone a Hackintosh, I was pretty intimidated by the task at first. But once I did my research, I was totally comfortable the entire time. This is a beast of a machine and it’s definitely going to be my daily driver for a long time to come.
I absolutely love the case I got. It’s absolutely silent and looks incredibly slick from the outside and was really easy to work with on the inside.  Best of all, I still have plenty of room to expand make this Hackintosh even more of a beast down the road.
One of the biggest things I got out of this was the potential of 4k. It’s going to be huge, maybe not immediately for consuming content, but for a monitor, you cannot beat it. The amount of information you can fit in one area is amazing and going back to anything with a lower resolution will be a major challenge, which is why I’ll be keeping an eye on www.hackurmac.com


Installation Troubleshooting Tips

                                                                 

1. Create your OS X UniBeast USB or iBoot disc drive as per guid www.hackurmac.com


2. Once you have created your bootable installer. You are ready to install your OS X version, Please follow the install procedures to the letter.

3. Select your first boot priority using F12 for Gigabyte motherboards, Or the hotkey for your manufacturers motherboard.

4. If you are having trouble reaching the installer. I suggest using the integrated graphics and add your discrete graphics card later. Use -x (safe mode) or -v (verbose mode 

5. Once OS X says the installation is complete. It Automatically restarts, this is where you select your USB drive for the last time. Once at the Chimera Boot Screen select your new installation, if you had to use boot flags for the installer then you need to use them again. I always find safe mode easier to get to the registration of OS X.

So there have been a lot of people with similar issues, in this thread, my goal is to create a nice simple list of things people can check before asking specific questions. Many times if you're having issues installing, it's one of these things. 

Installation Troubleshooting Tips & General Recommendations
For best results with your installation, make sure you've followed these recommendations. I've put them together from months of questions, so these tips should be pretty common and universal. Many people have neglected to follow these simple tips, and the installation has not worked.

1. Purchase and use a genuine Mac OS X Snow Leopard Retail Installation DVD
2. Use a SATA CD/DVD drive and SATA hard drive
3. Update your motherboard to the latest BIOS version available
4. Physically remove any extra RAM sticks so that your system has a total of no more than 4GB of RAM
5. Use only 1 graphics card in the 1st PCIe slot with 1 monitor plugged in.
6. Remove any USB peripherals besides keyboard and mouse.
7. Remove any hard drives besides the blank drive being used for OS X
8. Remove any PCI cards besides graphics- they may not be Mac compatible
9. Set BIOS to Optimized Defaults, then set SATA to AHCI mode and HPET to 64-bit
10. Set Boot Priority to boot from CD/DVD drive, then hard drive
11. If using a Gigabyte board, use Port 0 and 1 of the Blue Intel SATA ports
12. Intel Only. We do not support AMD.
13. iBoot + MultiBeast is known to work with the P55, X58 P35 and H55 chipsets and will most likely work with all Core 2 compatible boards.
14. If using a large > 1 TB Hard Drive, your system partition needs to be 1 TB or less.
15. Onboard Intel GMA HD graphics by themselves are currently unsupported. There are no available drivers- you'll need to use a discreet card.
16. MultiBeast should be run from the boot drive. Copy to Applications folder or Desktop.

Sleep - General Troubleshooting Tips

1. You must have the proper DSDT edits as per this post. All of the Gigabyte DSDTs in the DSDT Database are edited properly for sleep.
http://tonymacx86.blogspot.com/2009/12/ ... n-p55.html

2. To enable sleep, make sure to remove NullCPUPowerManagement.kext

3. Make sure you check all of the checkboxes in System Preferences/Energy Saver as shown in the picture below.



4. Make sure your DSDT is named DSDT.aml and is in your /Extra folder.

5. On Lion, use the boot flag darkwake=0 in your org.chameleon.Boot.plist. By default if installing using MultiBeast.

6. On Lion, to prevent CMOS reset after wake, then restart- use AppleRTC Patch from MultiBeast.

Hope this helps! Go team!

How to make a bootable pen drive for AMD MAVERICKS


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                                                 http://www.hackintoshbombay.com


Before we start:

This build involves 2 hard drives, OS X being on one and Windows being on the other for dual booting. I have not yet been successful with OS X and Windows on the same hard drive. If you have only one hard drive you can follow this guide to install OS X and then maybe try the dual boot yourself outside the guide. As I said, I don't know how to do this so won't be able to help at all.

The build: 
  • AMD Athlon X2 x64 @ 3.3Ghz
  • Biostar A780L Motherboard
  • ATI Radeon HD5770
  • 4GB DDR2 RAM
  • TrendNet TEW-648UBM USB wireless adapter
  • Apple Wired Keyboard
The ingredients:
  • OS X 10.9 Install DMG (download from the AppStore for free or via a torrent for stable speeds)
  • A working Hackintosh or real Mac
  • Pandora Installer (here)
  • 10.9 AMD kernel (here)
  • 8GB flash drive
  • OPTIONAL: Another 8GB flash drive
  • Kexts needed for your build
  • VoodooHDA Installer (here)
  • System.kext bundle (here) (its called AMD _Kernel_And_PM_rel2)
  • MyHack (here)
  • Kext Utiliy (here)
The reason I use two flash drives is just to save my skin. Hackintosh is not perfect so tiny things can really mess it up. I make a flash drive that is identical to the first one with the installer on. This is just incase anything goes wrong with the first one, and this second one I keep in a safe place in case my Hackintosh messes up for any reason. Its entirely up to you to use the second one, it is not needed for the installer at all.

Also I uploaded the kernel to Zippyshare cause I honestly cannot remember when page I got it from from THIS thread, and it would take forever to find that again.


Part 1, easy

I call this part easy since it uses MyHack. I did NOT use MyHack, but everyone has been using it to get Mavericks set up so far. I didn’t use MyHack cause when I did this, the beta wasn’t out yet so it did not work with Mavericks at all. You can follow either path. MyHack is easy to use and ‘should’ work. The second part is slightly harder since I can’t remember what I did exactly. 

Step 1:

Put your flash drive into the Mac and launch disk utility. Format the flash drive with 1 partition, name it anything but make sure its one word for easier access in terminal. Also set the Partition Scheme to GUID, by clicking options near the bottom of the partition screen. Once that is complete you can close Disk Utility for now.
Launch MyHack DMG and put the app into your applications file. Start the application. It will ask you to select what you want to create. Select install and then select OS X Mavericks (10.9). Then select the USB and it will create a bootable USB. It will ask you a few things before you finish, just select YES or NO, depending on your build.

Step 2:

Open the newly created USB and copy over the following things:
  • AMD Kernel (replace mach_kernel)
  • Folder with any extra kexts you made need
  • VoodooHDA PKG installer
  • System.kext from the pack 

Step 3

Now go to your system and launch the bios. 

Make sure it is set to boot from the USB stick you just created and also make sure the SATA mode is set to AHCI. I don’t know exactly which ‘section’ has the SATA mode.

Step 4:

If all is okay your USB should boot! Press F8 and any key, like space or something, to bring up the chameleon screen. It may also just have very basic text saying ‘Darwin Bootloader’, which is fine too. 
Now we need to do the flags. My flags will be different to yours if your system is different, they are a good place to start though. 
-v USBLegacyOff=Yes npci=0x2000 -f
For the beginning ALWAYS boot with “-v” and “-f”. This enables verbose mode so you see EXACTLY what is happening during the boot process. It also forces the kernel to ignore the kernel cache so it also loads all the kexts properly.

To diagnose booting problems (if it does not get to the installer) please please please post A PICTURE of exactly where it hangs / panics. This will help me / other people get it to go passed that point.

The initial MAY hang at a line about ‘IOBluetooth Controller’. Leave it for at least 3 minutes. If any lines come after it (normally about mounting) you have a graphics problem so boot with “GraphicsEnabler=No”

Step 5:

If all is okay you should get to the installer!

Launch disk utility by clicking on “Utilities” in the menu bar. Format the hard drive you want Mac installed to with a ONE WORD name (its much easier for further steps). Make sure it formats as MAC OS Journaled (extended), and GUID partition table. You can close disk utility and start the install. Be careful not to select the wrong hard drive to install to.

When the installer is complete DON’T DON’T DON’T restart. Load up terminal by clicking “Utilities” in the menu bar again. In terminal type in this exactly:
cp /mach_kernel /Volumes/XXX
 where XXX is the name of your hard drive. If it does not work also try 
cp mach_kernel /Volumes/XXX.
Now you can go ahead and restart.

Step 6:

Go back into your bios utility and choose to boot from the hard drive you just installed Mac to.

If everything went correctly do the same as before, by hitting F8 and spacebar a lot, and it should load the chameleon screen. Enter the same flags you used for install. The same rule applies here, if you hang anywhere / kernel panic just post a picture. It may also hang at “IOBluetooth” again.

Step 7:

If all goes fine, you will be on your Macintosh! Congratulations! We just need to do a bit more before we can fully use this puppy.

Load up system profiler by clicking the apple sign in the menu bar, and select “About this Mac”. Then select “System Profiler” from the dialog. IF your CPU clock is something like 3MHz then we need to replace the System kext. If not, then you’re set (but you can replace it anyway for safe keep).

To do this, launch kext utility and put in your password. Then drag and drop the “System.kext” from the "AMD _Kernel_And_PM_rel2" zip folder. Wait for it to finish and then reboot.

Step 8:

Now we just need to make boots more seamless

Launch Chameleon Wizard.  Click “org.chameleon.boot.plist” and check any boot flags you need. You can take off “-v”, but for the time being while you install a lot of things, rather keep it on. Also don’t install any themes until you have everything properly set up. Make sure “GUI” is ticked and “Timeout” is greater than 1. Once complete you can save and quit that app.

Step 9:

You can now reboot just to check that all the boot flags are working correctly. If so, you can move onto install VoodooHDA if you don’t have sound working already and anything else that you may need specific to your system.

End:

Congrats! If everything went find you will have a fully working Macintosh install! You can go ahead and update now too (I used the Software Updater). You should replace the kernel on your hard drive with the one from the USB after updating (but before rebooting) just to be safe. If you can ’t see ‘mach_kernel’ in your hard drive open Terminal and type this in:
defaults write com.apple.finder AppleShowAllFiles -boolean true && killall Finder
 and to reverse that 
defaults write com.apple.finder AppleShowAllFiles -boolean false && killall Finder 
As I said in the beginning of this guide, if you have ANY problems please feel free to ask my anything. Post pictures if its anything boot related as that will help me a load to diagnose your issue. Also at the end of this guide is some contact information if you feel the need. I do prefer you asking question publicly as some people may have the same problem as you.


Part 2, difficult

The reason I call this part difficult is cause I cannot EXACTLY recall what I did. This is me literally talking out of memory. I am going to re-do what I did, however, as soon as the Mavericks install finishes downloading (again, South African internet is a joke). I will obviously help out as much as I possibly can.

Step 1:

Okay lets get going. For these few steps you are going to need that working Mac.

Put your flash drive into the Mac and launch disk utility. Format the flash drive with 1 partition, name it anything but make sure its one word for easier access in terminal. Also set the Partition Scheme to GUID, by clicking options near the bottom of the partition screen. Once that is complete you can close Disk Utility for now.

Step 2:

Launch the Pandora.app you just downloaded and select Pandora Installer. It MAY ask you to install a specific theme. Just hit 'y' and enter. It will ask for your sudo password so enter it. The machine will restart so make sure you don't have anything running that needs to be saved. Pandora runs in terminal so don't be startled when that opens.

Step 3:

Type 1 in the terminal. Pandora will now ask for your sudo password again, so just enter it. Then type 1. Then type in no. Then type 1. Then drag and drop the OS X 10.9 DMG onto that window. Pandora will now copy the contents of OS X 10.9 to the flash drive. I don't know the steps that follow this step (I need to re-downloaded the Install DMG). It was pretty simple though, but feel free to ask if you get lost.

Step 4:

Copy the AMD kernel you downloaded to the root of the flash drive. It will replace the original mach_kernel so don't worry. Once that is complete we are almost ready to boot! Before you boot, place any kexts that you need for your device in a folder called whatever you want in the root of the flash drive. Also place the VoodooHDA PKG and 'AMD Kernel and REL2.zip' there. This is so you can install them once your system is properly installed.

Step 5:

Now go to your system and launch the bios. 

Make sure it is set to boot from the USB stick you just created and also make sure the SATA mode is set to AHCI. I don’t know exactly which ‘section’ has the SATA mode.

Step 6:

If all is okay your USB should boot! Press F8 and any key, like space or something, to bring up the chameleon screen. It may also just have very basic text saying ‘Darwin Bootloader’, which is fine too. 
Now we need to do the flags. My flags will be different to yours if your system is different, they are a good place to start though. 

-v USBLegacyOff=Yes npci=0x2000 -f

For the beginning ALWAYS boot with “-v” and “-f”. This enables verbose mode so you see EXACTLY what is happening during the boot process. It also forces the kernel to ignore the kernel cache so it also loads all the kexts properly.

To diagnose booting problems (if it does not get to the installer) please please please post A PICTURE of exactly where it hangs / panics. This will help me / other people get it to go passed that point.

The initial MAY hang at a line about ‘IOBluetooth Controller’. Leave it for at least 3 minutes. If any lines come after it (normally about mounting) you have a graphics problem so boot with “GraphicsEnabler=No”

Step 7:

If all is okay you should get to the installer!

Launch disk utility by clicking on “Utilities” in the menu bar. Format the hard drive you want Mac installed to with a ONE WORD name (its much easier for further steps). Make sure it formats as MAC OS Journaled (extended), and GUID partition table. You can close disk utility and start the install. Be careful not to select the wrong hard drive to install to.

When the installer is complete DON’T DON’T DON’T restart. Load up terminal by clicking “Utilities” in the menu bar again. In terminal type in this exactly:
cp /mach_kernel /Volumes/XXX
 where XXX is the name of your hard drive. If it does not work also try 
cp mach_kernel /Volumes/XXX
Now you can go ahead and restart.

Step 8:

Go back into your bios utility and choose to boot from the hard drive you just installed Mac to.

If everything went correctly do the same as before, by hitting F8 and spacebar a lot, and it should load the chameleon screen. Enter the same flags you used for install. The same rule applies here, if you hang anywhere / kernel panic just post a picture. It may also hang at “IOBluetooth” again.

Step 9:

If all goes fine, you will be on your Macintosh! Congratulations! We just need to do a bit more before we can fully use this puppy.

Load up system profiler by clicking the apple sign in the menu bar, and select “About this Mac”. Then select “System Profiler” from the dialog. IF your CPU clock is something like 3MHz then we need to replace the System kext. If not, then you’re set (but you can replace it anyway for safe keep).

To do this, launch kext utility and put in your password. Then drag and drop the “System.kext” from the "AMD _Kernel_And_PM_rel2" zip folder. Wait for it to finish and then reboot.

Step 10:

Now we just need to make boots more seamless

Launch Chameleon Wizard.  Click “org.chameleon.boot.plist” and check any boot flags you need. You can take off “-v”, but for the time being while you install a lot of things, rather keep it on. Also don’t install any themes until you have everything properly set up. Make sure “GUI” is ticked and “Timeout” is greater than 1. Once complete you can save and quit that app.

Step 11:

You can now reboot just to check that all the boot flags are working correctly. If so, you can move onto install VoodooHDA if you don’t have sound working already and anything else that you may need specific to your system.

End:

Congrats! If everything went find you will have a fully working Macintosh install! You can go ahead and update now too (I used the Software Updater). You should replace the kernel on your hard drive with the one from the USB after updating (but before rebooting) just to be safe. If you can ’t see ‘mach_kernel’ in your hard drive open Terminal and type this in:
defaults write com.apple.finder AppleShowAllFiles -boolean true && killall Finder
 and to reverse that 
defaults write com.apple.finder AppleShowAllFiles -boolean false && killall Finder